Satellite Image of Hurricane Florence near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina
Taylor, Alan. “Photos: The Aftermath of Hurricane Florence.” The Atlantic, Atlantic Media Company, 16 Sept. 2018, www.theatlantic.com/photo/2018/09/photos-the-aftermath-of-hurricane-florence/570397

As Hurricane Florence hit North Carolina, it made landfall near Wrightsville Beach at 7:15 a.m. ET. It was classified as a Category 1 hurricane as it had sustained winds of 90 miles per hour. It weakened and went from a hurricane to a tropical storm, and later to a tropical depression. Although not high on the Saffir-Simpson scale, deadly storm surge and flooding were expected. However, by Sept. 4-5, due to rapid intensification, Florence was ranked as a Category 4 hurricane with estimated sustained winds of 130 miles per hour.

Governors of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia, and Maryland declared a state of emergency. Soon, as the hurricane showed its potential, roads became hazardous and trees were precarious, and the death toll went from 16 to 42 in a matter of days. Florence also had winds which uprooted trees and led to outspread power outages throughout the Carolinas.

“[The storm has] never been more dangerous than it is right now,” Governor Roy Cooper said. “Wherever you live in North Carolina, be alert for sudden flooding.”


Farmhouse surrounded by floodwaters
Taylor, Alan. “Photos: The Aftermath of Hurricane Florence.” The Atlantic, Atlantic Media Company, 16 Sept. 2018, www.theatlantic.com/photo/2018/09/photos-the-aftermath-of-hurricane-florence/570397

Moreover, rescue teams have been going out and helping people affected by the high-rising floodwaters. Hundreds of people have been rescued and placed in shelters. At least 170 patients have been put in four medical shelters across the state. People have also been advised to stay out of the waters as they’re full of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants. In North Carolina, people are still dealing with the aftermath of the storm such as the recent mosquito problem and waste poison water.